2010 Sacagawea Dollar

2010 Sacagawea Dollar

After experiencing many years of limited production, the $1 coins featuring Sacagawea underwent somewhat of a rebirth. The 2010 Sacagawea Dollar was the second year of an ongoing series of annually rotating reverse designs celebrating the accomplishments and contributions of Native Americans. Officially called Native American Dollars, the coins were minted in much larger quantities following the new legislative requirements.

The reverse design of the coin features the Hiawatha Belt, surrounding a bundle of five arrows. The belt is a visual record of the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy. The symbols on the belt and the arrows represent the five nations of the confederacy, Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, and Seneca. Inscriptions indicate the theme of the reverse “Haudenosaunee” and “Great Law of Peace”. The reverse was designed by Thomas Cleveland.

The obverse of the coin continued to feature the same portrait introduced with the series in 2000. The Shoshone woman and her child Jean Baptiste Charbonneau appear together. The inscriptions read “Liberty” and “In God We Trust” with the date and mint mark moved to the edge of the coin.

The 2010 Sacagawea Dollar was produced in relatively large quantities, with more than 80 million circulating quality coins struck at the Philadelphia and Denver Mints. The majority of these coins were distributed through the United States Mint’s Direct Ship Program, which provides a method for individuals and small businesses to order quantities of $1 coins in 250-coin increments.

Proof and satin finish versions of the coin were produced for distribution in the United States Mint’s annual collector coin sets. Numismatic rolls of 25 coins were also available for sale at $35.95, beginning on January 22.


2010 Sacagawea (Native American) Dollar Mintages

2010-P: 32,060,000
2010-D: 48,720,000
2010-S Proof: 1,689,216